Make the most of every day!

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Living with a chronic health condition can be tough. Life is a constant battle against your own body and it’s so exhausting. I’ve come to terms with the fact that I may not be able to do certain things that I’ve always wanted to do at ease (such as going to Glastonbury which I’ve been watching on the TV and have gotten extremely jealous) but there are things that I can do. I’m trying to take steps to improve my health as much as I can and focus on the things that I do have control of. It’s draining pretending to be okay when you really just want to lie in bed and cry but I refuse to let this condition beat me. It’s frustrating knowing that having a “good” day and making the most of it by doing something will more than likely lead to repercussions in the form of fatigue and more pain but I can’t let that stop me from enjoying those days. I can’t just sit in waiting for a bad day to happen and waiting for the next flare. That isn’t living, that is existing. I am determined to live the best life I can, even if it may be different than I planned!
Love, hugs & hope, Charlie xoxo

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Not all disabilities are visible…

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So lets be honest, although most of us probably don’t want to admit it, being judgemental seems to be human nature. I have judged people and I have been judged but we don’t know everyone’s story and it’s a sad trait to have. I guess a lot of it is to do with stereotyping. There are so many stereotypes out there and these seem to get passed from generation to generation and it really needs to stop.
I went to a hospital appointment recently with my carer and was waiting to park in the disabled bay. I’m a 25 year old woman with invisible disabilities and I was judged by two different people whilst waiting. A gentleman who was coming out of the bay wound his window down and made a hand gesture to call me a “w*nker” and an elderly woman who must have wanted the space called me a “silly cow” and waved her blue badge at me so I waved mine back at her! A similar thing happened to my friend recently. She is 18 and she was waiting for a disabled bay and an elderly woman wound her window down and told her that those bays were reserved for disabled people so she showed her badge and the lady then said that they were for “elderly people” and that she should go and park elsewhere.
Think about it. Have you been judged? Have you judged someone? We don’t know everyone’s individual story.
The really thin girl you assumed was anorexic may be desperately trying to put on weight or could be fighting an invisible illness that makes gaining weight difficult for her.
The guy you saw on crutches struggling to walk last week who is walking today may be suffering with a condition that varies massively, it doesn’t mean he was faking it.
Please try not to stare at the young girl in the wheelchair trying to figure out what is wrong with her.
The guy who has used the disabled toilet but looks “normal” could be suffering with IBD.
Not all disabilities are visible. Not all disabilities are the same. Think before you judge.

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Love & hugs,
Charlie xoxo

Awareness Needed…

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Last night I was taken to hospital by ambulance after passing out and being unresponsive due to severe pain levels. Unfortunately once again I was faced with people who had never heard of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and didn’t know how to treat me. I was pricked with needles numerous times, even after saying I have a connective tissue disorder and have fragile veins and usually need a more permanent line for IV’s, I was left for hours without pain relief as they didn’t know what to give me after I had a cardiac arrest in November and unfortunately there was not a lot that could be done. I do not blame the medics as they were very busy and the staff were all very kind and wanting to help, but this shows how we need to raise more awareness of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome and all the other “rare” and invisible conditions out there. We need more specialists locally, not just in London. We need a clear care plan for when things like this do happen. We need help. We need AWARENESS!
#InvisibleIllnessVisibleHope

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I may not look sick on the outside but on the inside there is a different story so I decided to take a picture where I look “well” and write some of the conditions and symptoms I have that are invisible.

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Together we can make a difference ♥

Update.

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On Tuesday I had to go for a flexible cystoscopy to have a look in my bladder. It was uncomfortable but everything looked okay and there isn’t a physical blockage causing my urinary problems, which leads us back to thinking it’s due to signals not being sent to my brain etc. I now wait for a follow up appointment with my urologist to discuss this, my MRI results and the sacral nerve implant. If I’m honest I’m really nervous about the thought of another operation but I’m going to make sure that all my questions are answered and all tests are done before I even think about it…
Today I went to an appointment with my cardiologist. He was a lovely gentleman but couldn’t really give me much more advice other than to lift my bed at an angle, drink more water and increase my salt intake. He has also put me on some new medication which hopefully will help, so fingers crossed!
Hope you are all well.
Love & Hugs, Charlie.

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“Joint Hypermobility: Emerging disease or illness behaviour?”

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“Joint hypermobility syndrome is a common clinical entity which is much misunderstood, overlooked, misdiagnosed and mistreated. It was first described in the 1960s as a purely musculoskeletal condition due to joint laxity and hypermobility occurring in otherwise healthy individuals. Some four decades later it is now perceived to be a multi-systemic heritable disorder of connective tissue with manifestations occurring far beyond the confines of the locomotor system and with ramifications potentially affecting most, if not all, of the bodily systems in one way or another.

Most authorities in the field find it clinically indistinguishable from the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome – hypermobility type (formerly, EDS type III). In >50% of patients the diagnosis is delayed for ≥10 years. Failure to diagnose and treat the condition correctly results in needless pain and suffering and in many patients to a progressive decline in their quality of life and in some to a loss of independence.”

http://www.clinmed.rcpjournal.org/content/13/Suppl_6/s50.full

So I’ve just read Professor Grahame’s above journal and I actually have tears coming down my face. It is so strange to read something and just think “Wow, this describes exactly how I am, how I feel and what has happened to my body”. This has explained so much to me and if you haven’t read it I highly recommend that you do, in fact it would mean a lot to me if you could read and share this to help me in my journey to raise awareness. Professor Grahame is such a fantastic man and his work for those with EDS is just brilliant.
“To dismiss disparate symptoms as ‘illness behaviour’ is, in my view, wrong and does much disservice both to our patients and to our reputation as a profession.”
That just shows how much he genuinely wants to help those with EDS. Professor Grahame you are a wonderful gentleman and thank you so much for your research into EDS and fighting with us!
Hope you’re all having a pain free day.
Love & hugs, Charlie x

EDS Awareness.

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Another EDS awareness picture. Feel free to share. Lets get EDS on everyone’s lips.